Penal Substitution and Isaiah 53 (Sermon Notes)

January 5, 2009

Penal Substitution and Isaiah 53 (Sermon Notes)

“Jesus Carried Our Sins”
(Isaiah 52:13 – 53:12)

By Greg Gibson

Problem: God’s justice must punish us, but His love desired to forgive us.

Solution: Penal substitution (substitutionary atonement) by God Himself paying our penalty.

Only the God-man, Jesus, could qualify as the substitute.

    Animal sacrifices couldn’t take away sin: “it is impossible for the blood of bulls and goats to take away sins” (Heb. 10:4).

    Mere human sacrifice couldn’t take away sin: “No man can redeem the life of another or give to God a ransom for him” (Ps. 49:7).

Pictures of penalties paid by a human substitute:

    1. Billion dollar debt paid by the lender.

    2. Murderer judged guilty and given the death penalty, but paid by the judge.

Old Testament pictures of Christ’s sacrifice by substitution:

    1. Adam and Eve: God made clothes of skin to cover Adam and Eve’s guilt (Gen. 3:21, cf. 3:7).

    2. Abraham and Isaac: “He went over and took the ram and sacrificed it as a burnt offering instead of his son” (Gen. 22:7-14).

    3. Israel’s Passover: God saw the blood and passed over in judgment (Ex. 12:13, 23, 27). “Christ our Passover lamb has been sacrificed” (1 Cor. 5:7).

Isaiah 53 is a Messianic prophecy from ~700 B.C., yet fulfilled in the 1st century. (Evidence that God wrote Scripture through men.)

The “servant” in 52:13 and 53:11 is the same Messiah prophesied earlier in Isaiah:

    “The virgin will be with child and will give birth to a son, and will call him Immanuel (God with us)” (Is. 7:14).

    “For to us a child is born, to us a son is given, and the government will be on his shoulders. And he will be called Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace” (Is. 9:6).

1. Messiah Will Suffer, Yet Be Exalted (Isaiah 52:13 – 53:3)

“Did not the Christ have to suffer these things and then enter his glory?” (Lk. 24:26).

“And they struck him in the face” (Jn. 19:3; Mt. 26:67, 27:30).

“He came to that which was his own, but his own did not receive him” (Jn. 1:11).

“…and became obedient to death – even death on a cross! Therefore God exalted him to the highest place and gave him the name that is above every name” (Phil. 2:8-9).

“Exalted to the right hand of God” (Acts 2:33).

2. Messiah Will Be Punished as Our Substitute (Isaiah 53:4-6)

Penal substitution: “Surely he took up our weaknesses and carried our sorrows, yet we considered him stricken by God, smitten by him, and afflicted. But he was pierced for our transgressions, he was crushed for our iniquities; the punishment that brought us peace was on him…and the LORD has laid on him the iniquity of us all” (53:4-6).

“He himself bore our sins in his body on the tree, so that we might die to sins and live for righteousness; by his wounds you have been healed. For you were like sheep going astray” (1 Pet. 2:24).

“God made him who had no sin to be sin for us, so that in him we might become the righteousness of God” (2 Cor. 5:21).

“the Lord Jesus Christ, who gave himself for our sins” (Gal. 1:3-4).

*Application: Next time you’re tempted to sin, remember that Jesus carried your sins (your anger, hatred, pride, boasting, lying, stealing, lust, sexual immorality, idolatry).

Penal substitution: “And by his wounds we are healed” (53:5).

    “He himself bore our sins in his body on the tree, so that we might die to sins and live for righteousness; by his wounds you have been healed. For you were like sheep going astray” (1 Pet. 2:24).

    Not a guarantee of healing in the atonement. Context of Is. 53:5 and 1 Pet. 2:24 is spiritual healing, not physical healing. Sickness is used as a metaphor for sin.

3. Messiah Will Be Like a Perfect Sacrificial Lamb (Isaiah 53:7-9)

Penal substitution: “For the sin of my people he was struck.”

“For we do not have a high priest who is unable to sympathize with our weaknesses, but we have one who has been tempted in every way, just as we are – yet was without sin” (Heb. 4:15).

“Such a high priest meets our need – one who is holy, blameless, pure set apart from sinners, exalted above the heavens” (Heb. 7:26).

“John saw Jesus coming toward him and said, ‘Look, the Lamb of God, who takes away the sin of the world!” (Jn. 1:29).

“Then I saw a Lamb, looking as if it had been killed, standing in the center of the throne” (Rev. 5:6).

4. God the Father Planned Messiah’s Mission (Isaiah 53:10)

“Yet it was the LORD’s will to crush him and cause him to suffer”

“This man was handed over to you by God’s set purpose and foreknowledge” (Acts 2:23).

“He sent his one and only Son into the world that we might live through him” (1 Jn. 4:9).

5. Messiah’s Mission Will Succeed (Isaiah 53:11-12)

“After the suffering of his soul, he will see the light of life and be satisfied…Therefore I will give him a portion among the great, and he will divide the spoils with the strong.”

Penal substitution: “he will carry their sins…For he carried the sin of many, and made intercession for the transgressors.”

*Application

False Substitutes That Can’t Pay Your Penalty: Baptism, church membership, church attendance, trying to be good.

Only one of 2 people can pay for your sins: You, or God Himself

“Seek the LORD while he may be found; call on him while he is near. Let the wicked forsake his way and the evil man his thought. Let him turn to the LORD, and he will have mercy on him, and to our God, for he will freely pardon” (Is. 55:6-7).

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“5 Types of Sermons”

December 30, 2008

By Greg Gibson

There’s a new chart at JesusSaidFollowMe titled 5 Types of Sermons

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Search Inside the Book “ALL Old Testament Laws Cancelled”

October 20, 2008

By Greg Gibson

150x199.jpgIf you’ve wondered what’s in the book “ALL Old Testament Laws Cancelled”, wonder no more. Now, with the help of Google Book Search, you can search up to 20% of the book’s pages.

Two good places to start are the Subject Index (p. 153) and Author Index (p. 155, which includes several interesting quotes). Start searching here: New Covenant Theology

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“ALL Old Covenant or Old Testament Laws Cancelled?”

October 6, 2008

By Greg Gibson

Most Christians believe that the Sabbath command is cancelled. And, some believe that all Old Covenant laws are cancelled, including the whole Decalogue. So, why do I believe that all Old Testament laws are cancelled?

In my book “ALL Old Testament Laws Cancelled” I devoted 3 chapters to explaining why the laws from Genesis – Sinai are cancelled. Here are the 3 chapter titles…

13. Since Genesis Is Part of the Law, the Commands From Genesis – Sinai Are Cancelled (Genesis is part of the law as revelation, not as covenant which started later at Sinai.)

16. The Church Is Built on the Foundation of New Testament Apostles and Prophets’ Teaching (Eph. 2:19-20ff., cf. 3:5, 4:11)

17. Archaeology Testifies That the Bible Contains 2 Separate Canons (Rules) (The Old Covenant’s structure has several parallels to ancient, near-Eastern treaties, which included historical introductions. Genesis appears to be the historical introduction to the Old Covenant law of Moses.)

Here is Chapter 13 in its entirety…

“Did you know that Genesis is part of the law as revelation (Old Testament?) Here are 4 reasons showing why Genesis is part of the law…

1. Genesis 21 is called “the law” in Galatians 4:21-22.

    “Tell me, you who desire to be under the law, do you not listen to the law? For it is written that Abraham had two sons: one by a slave woman and one by a free woman” (Gal. 4:21-22 referring to Gen. 21; cf. Rom. 3:31ff.)

2. The phrase “law and prophets” means “Genesis – Malachi” (the whole Old Testament).

3. Moses wrote the book of Genesis.

4. Archaeology testifies that Genesis is the historical introduction to the Old Covenant canon. God patterned the Old Covenant’s literary structure with some similarities to ancient, near-Eastern treaties, which included an historical introduction before the actual covenant document.

Ancient covenants were put into effect with a surrounding body of literature, a.k.a. canon. Covenant produces canon. Our Bible is made of 2 major covenants, the Old and New covenants, each surrounded by its own canon, the Old and New Testaments.

(To understand this more, see The Structure of Biblical Authority in #17 below…)

So, when the New Testament says the law is cancelled, that includes Genesis, not just post-Sinai commands.” (Excerpted from the book: “ALL Old Testament Laws Cancelled”, 24 Reasons Why All Old Testament Laws Are Cancelled, And All New Testament Laws Are for Our Obedience, by Greg Gibson, p. 86)

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“Did the Holy Spirit Replace the Law?”

October 6, 2008

By Greg Gibson

Did the Holy Spirit replace the law of Moses? Some Christians have concluded that based on Gal. 5:18 and Rom. 7:6. (Yet, perhaps a better term to describe the relationship between the law of Moses and the Spirit is “contrast” instead of “replace.”)

So, does the Spirit contrast the law of Moses? Yes, but we need to be careful not to read the word “only” into Gal. 5:18 and Rom. 7:6, since the law of Moses is contrasted with at least 7 other truths…

8 Contrasts to the Law of Moses

1. The Law of Moses vs. the Spirit

    “But if you are led by the Spirit, you are not under the law” (Gal. 5:18).

    “But now we are released from the law, having died to that which held us captive, so that we serve not under the old written code but in the new life of the Spirit” (Rom. 7:6).

2. The Law of Moses vs. Grace and Truth

    “For the law was given through Moses, grace and truth came through Jesus Christ” (Jn. 1:17).

3. The Law of Moses vs. Faith

    “Now before faith came, we were held captive under the law, imprisoned until the coming faith would be revealed…But now that faith has come, we are no longer under a guardian…” (Gal. 3:23-25; cf. justification 3:11-12, 24-25, and righteousness 3:21).

4. The Law of Moses vs. Adoption

    “But when the fullness of time had come, God sent forth his Son, born of woman, born under the law, to redeem those who are under the law, so that we might receive adoption as sons” (Gal. 4:4-5).

5. The Law of Moses vs. Christ’s Priesthood

    “Now if perfection had been attainable through the Levitical priesthood (for under it the people received the law), what further need would there have been for another priest to arise after the order of Melchizedek, rather than one named after the order of Aaron? For when there is a change in the priesthood, there is necessarily a change in the law as well” (Heb. 7:11-12).

    “For the law appoints men in their weakness as high priests, but the word of the oath, which came later than the law, appoints a Son who has been made perfect forever” (Heb. 7:28).

6. The Law of Moses vs. a Better Hope of Approaching God

    “On the one hand, a former commandment is set aside because of its weakness and uselessness (for the law made nothing perfect); but on the other hand, a better hope is introduced, through which we draw near to God” (Heb. 7:18-19).

7. The Law of Moses vs. Christ’s Sacrifice

    “…’You have neither desired nor taken pleasure in sacrifices and offerings and burnt offerings and sin offerings’ (these are offered according to the law), then he added, ‘Behold, I have come to do your will. He abolishes the first in order to establish the second. And by that will we have been sanctified through the offering of the body of Jesus Christ once for all” (Heb. 10:8-10, cf. 1ff.).

8. The Law of Moses vs. the Law of Christ

    “To those under the law I became as one under the law (though not being myself under the law) that I might win those under the law. To those outside the law I became as one outside the law (not being outside the law of God but under the law of Christ) that I might win those outside the law” (1 Cor. 9:20-21).

(This is not to imply that there were no Spirit, faith, grace and truth during the law of Moses. Few Israelites possessed saving faith or the indwelling Spirit. But, all New Covenant saints have faith in Christ and the indwelling Spirit.)

It’s important to understand that all 8 points above contrast the Old Covenant law of Moses (not all law including the New Covenant law of Christ) to New Covenant truths. The law of Christ is even distinguished and affirmed in one of those contrasts (1 Cor. 9:20-21). And, the context of Galatians “criticizes” the law of Moses in redemptive history. Plus, Galatians gives several commands, and also affirms the law of Christ…

    “Bear one another’s burdens, and so fulfill the law of Christ.” (Gal. 6:2)

Jesus Christ the New Lawgiver has a law inspired and written by the Spirit in the New Testament and on our hearts, for His people who have faith in Christ, who are adopted by the Father, and led by the Spirit.

So no, the Spirit (alone) didn’t replace the law. The Spirit is only one of 8 contrasts vs. the law of Moses.

Perhaps these 8 contrasts also help us understand how Christ fulfills the Law and Prophets. He fulfills them by everything He is, does, and teaches; by His Person, His works (including His Sprit), and His words (including His commands).

Here’s how I explained it in my book “ALL Old Testament Laws Cancelled”

“Moses’ Law Prepared Unjustified, Spirit-Less Slaves for Christ’s 1st Coming

One reason why God gave the law of Moses to Israel was to tutor/prepare them for Messiah’s 1st coming, so they might be justified by faith, adopted, and Spirit indwelled. But now, we don’t need the Mosaic law to tutor/prepare us because Messiah has already come, we are justified by faith (Gal. 3:23-25), adopted (Gal. 3:26 – 4:7), and Spirit-indwelled (Gal. 5:18).

Christ’s Law Helps Prepare Justified, Spirit-Indwelled Heirs for His 2nd Coming

Moses’ law prepared unjustified, Spirit-less slaves for Christ’s 1st coming. But, Christ’s law helps prepare justified, Spirit-indwelled heirs for His 2nd coming.”

(“ALL Old Testament Laws Cancelled”, 24 Reasons Why All Old Testament Laws Are Cancelled, And All New Testament Laws Are for Our Obedience, by Greg Gibson, pp. 118.)

Edited April 1, 2009

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“What Is the Law of Christ?”

October 3, 2008

(The following is a free excerpt from the book “ALL Old Testament Laws Cancelled” by Greg Gibson)

The Bible Never Criticizes the Law of Christ, But Praises It

Some Covenant Theologians think that the law of Christ = the law of Moses. However, does the law of Christ include, “…nor shall you wear a garment of cloth made of two kinds of material?” (Lev. 19:19). And, does the Law of Moses include, “Make disciples of all nations, baptizing them…?” (Mt. 28:19). No, the law of Moses and the law of Christ obviously refer to 2 different time periods in redemptive history.

The Bible criticizes the law of Moses, but never the law of Christ. In fact, the Bible praises the law of Christ…

Christ Is a New Lawgiver, Not Just a Law Keeper:
See the “12 New Commands From Christ’s New Law” below.

Messiah’s Law Is for the Gentiles:
“…He will bring forth justice to the nations…the coastlands shall wait for His law” (Is. 42:1, 4).

Christians Are Not Lawless, But In-Lawed to Christ:
“…not being without law of God, but in-lawed (Gk.) to Christ…” (1 Cor. 9:21).

We Must Fulfill the Law of Christ:
“Bear one another’s burdens, and so fulfill the law of Christ” (Gal. 6:2).

What exactly is the law of Christ? Scripture doesn’t tell us. But, it may be all laws given by Christ and His apostles in the New Testament. Doug Moo thinks that in addition to those laws it includes the Holy Spirit’s enablement and the motivation of love…

    “It is more difficult to determine whether the law of Christ includes specific teachings and principles. Many deny that this is the case, but their reasons for doing so often betray a bias against finding any specific demands as binding on Christians. The work of Schrage and others has shown that Paul and the other apostles were quite willing to impose specific commandments on their charges; and these commandments were, in fact, often drawn from, or reflective of, Jesus’ own teachings. For these reasons, I think it is highly probable that Paul thought of the law of Christ as including within it the teachings of Jesus and the apostolic witness, based on his life and teaching, about what it means to reverence God in daily life. This is not, however, to deny the importance of love or the direction of the Spirit. The ‘law of Christ,’ Paul’s shorthand expression for that form of God’s law applicable to new covenant believers, includes all these. Longenecker’s succinct summary says it well: The law of Christ stands in Paul’s thought for those ‘prescriptive principles stemming from the heart of the gospel (usually embodied in the example and teachings of Jesus), which are meant to be applied to specific situations by the direction and enablement of the Holy Spirit, being always motivated and conditioned by love.'”

Moo may be right. But, it’s not important whether the phrase “law of Christ” includes Christ’s laws alone, or also the Holy Sprit and love, since we agree they’re included in the New Testament, and crucial for obedience. Remember, this book focuses on which laws to obey (N.T.), more than how to obey (the Holy Spirit’s grace) and why to obey (love). Even as the law of Moses functioned as both regulation and revelation, so may the law of Christ.

(Excerpted from the book: “ALL Old Testament Laws Cancelled”
24 Reasons Why All Old Testament Laws Are Cancelled, And All New Testament Laws Are for Our Obedience, by Greg Gibson, pp. 121-122.)

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“The Law Written on the Heart”

October 3, 2008

(The following is a free excerpt from the book “ALL Old Testament Laws Cancelled” by Greg Gibson)

Objection: “But the New Covenant Law Is Written in the Heart, Not the New Testament”

Since the New Covenant law is written in the heart (Heb. 8:10), does that mean that it’s not also written in the New Testament?

Let’s explore what the words “write on the heart” mean by surveying parallel verses. We find the idea of “writing on the heart” at least 6 times in Scripture…

“Write My Laws on the Heart” and “Bind Them on the Body”
Means “Keep My Commands”

    1. “My son, do not forget my teaching, but let your heart keep my commandments, for length of days and years of life and peace they will add to you. Let not steadfast love and faithfulness forsake you; bind them around your neck; write them on the tablet of your heart” (Pr. 3:1-3).

    2. “My son, keep my words and treasure up my commandments with you; keep my commandments and live; keep my teaching as the apple of your eye; bind them on your fingers; write them on the tablet of your heart” (Pr. 7:1-3).

Sin (Disobedience to God’s Law) Can Be Written on the Heart

    3. “The sin of Judah is written with a pen of iron, with a point of diamond it is engraved on the tablet of their heart, and on the horns of their altars, while their children remember their altars and their Asherim” (Jer. 17:1-2).

“Put My Laws in Their Hearts/Minds” Results in Obedience

    4.-5. “I will put my law within them, and I will write it on their hearts. And I will be their God, and they shall be my people” (Jer. 31:33; cf. Heb. 8:10).

“Written on Our Heart” Likely Means “Loved by Us”

    6. “You yourselves are our letter of recommendation, written on our hearts (loved by us), to be known and read by all. And you show that you are a letter from Christ delivered by us, written not with ink but with the Spirit of the living God, not on tablets of stone but on tablets of human hearts” (2 Cor. 3:2-3).

In addition to those 6 passages, there are at least 3 similar passages about binding God’s commands on the heart and body. This is significant because in Pr. 3:3 and 7:3 above, “write commands on the tablet of your heart” = “bind them around your neck/ fingers” = “keep My commands.” So, writing on the heart, binding on the body, and obeying are likely synonyms from Hebrew parallelism.

Binding God’s Commands on the Heart/Body
Is a Metaphor for Obeying His Commands

    “My son, keep your father’s commandment, and forsake not your mother’s teaching. Bind them on your heart always; tie them around your neck” (Pr. 6:20-21; cf. 1:9).

    “You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your might. And these words that I command you today shall be on your heart…You shall bind them as a sign on your hand…” (Deut. 6:4-8).

    “And if you will indeed obey my commandments…You shall therefore lay up these words of mine in your heart and in your soul, and you shall bind them as a sign on your hand, and they shall be as frontlets between your eyes. You shall teach them to your children…” (Deut. 11:13, 18-19).

The Old Covenant Law
Was In Regenerate Saints’ Hearts and the Old Testament

    “And these words that I command you today shall be on your heart” (Deut. 6:6).

    “You shall therefore lay up these words of mine in your heart and in your soul…” (Deut. 11:18).

    “I desire to do your will, O my God; your law is within my heart” (Ps. 40:8).

    “I have stored up your word in my heart, that I might not sin against you” (Ps. 119:11).

Antinomianism errs by reading the word “only” into Heb. 8:10, like this, “I will put my laws into their minds, and write them (ONLY) on their hearts (not in the New Testament)…”

Remember earlier, we saw that Old Covenant saints probably already had all 7 New Covenant blessings from Jer. 31:31-34, including the law written both in their hearts and the Old Testament. So, New Covenant saints can also have the New Covenant law of Christ written both in their hearts and the New Testament.

In Hebrew and Greek, the heart is the center of the mind, emotions, will, desires, etc. So, God writing His New Covenant law in our hearts is a metaphor meaning He will regenerate our hearts to remember, love, and obey His laws.

Plus, since the law in the heart is a metaphor, we need to be careful about trying to reason additional doctrine from it. The hermeneutics of metaphor will not allow us to reason, “Since God’s law is written in the heart, therefore it is not written in the New Testament.”

Metaphors communicate that A is like B in some ways, but not all ways. So, beware of pressing a metaphor’s details since it’s designed to illustrate only some truths. Metaphors, parables, and types are all designed to symbolize major themes, not details.

In conclusion, God writing His laws on our hearts has nothing to do with content or location, that is, the heart instead of the New Testament. “…God’s love has been poured into our hearts…” (Rom. 5:5) does not mean that His love is not also recorded in Scripture. He wrote His law in the New Testament, and made it precious to our regenerate hearts, guaranteeing our obedience.

(Excerpted from the book: “ALL Old Testament Laws Cancelled”
24 Reasons Why All Old Testament Laws Are Cancelled, And All New Testament Laws Are for Our Obedience, by Greg Gibson, pp. 115-117.)

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“Not Under Law, But Under Grace”

October 3, 2008

(The following is a free excerpt from the book “ALL Old Testament Laws Cancelled” by Greg Gibson)

Objection: “But We’re Not Under Law, But Under Grace”

Yes, we’re not under law, but under grace. But, what does that mean? (By the way, the Bible never contrasts law and gospel. But, it contrasts law and grace twice.) Here are the 2 key passages…

    “Do not present your members to sin as instruments for unrighteousness, but present yourselves to God as those who have been brought from death to life, and your members to God as instruments for righteousness. For sin will have no dominion over you, since you are not under law but under grace. What then? Are we to sin because we are not under law but under grace? By no means! Do you not know that if you present yourselves to anyone as obedient slaves, you are slaves of the one whom you obey, either of sin, which leads to death, or of obedience, which leads to righteousness?” (Rom. 6:14-15).

    “And from his fullness we have all received, grace upon grace. For the law was given through Moses; grace and truth came through Jesus Christ” (Jn. 1:16).

What do those 2 passages tell us about law and grace? Here are 3 clear facts about law and grace…

    1. The relationship between law and grace is a contrast, not a comparison. (See the word “but” in Rom. 6.)

    2. In John 1:16, law and grace refer to 2 different times in redemptive history: Law was from the time of Moses – Christ (~1445 B.C. – 30 A.D.) and grace is from the time of Christ – the end (~30 A.D. – the end). Therefore, not under law, but under grace refers to redemption accomplished for the corporate Church in the 1st century, not the time of Moses.

    3. In Rom. 6:14, law and grace refer to 2 different lifestyles: sin vs. obedience. (Most in Israel were characterized by sin, but all in the Church are characterized by obedience.) Therefore, not under law, but under grace also refers to redemption applied to individuals in the 1st – 21st centuries.

Some historic Dispensationalists believed there was no grace during the time of law. But, that view is easily disproved by a simple, concordance topical word study…

    “But Noah found grace in the eyes of the LORD” (Gen. 6:8).

    “…you (Moses) have found grace in My sight” (Ex. 33:12).

    “Toward the scorners He is scornful, but to the humble He gives grace” (Prov. 3:34).

And, some modern Antinomians believe there is no law during the time of grace. However, that view is also easily disproved from a concordance…

    “Bear one another’s burdens, and so fulfill the law of Christ” (Gal. 6:2).

    “I will put my laws into their minds, and write them on their hearts…” (Heb. 8:10).

    “He will bring forth justice to the nations…coastlands shall wait for His law” (Is. 42:1, 4).

    “Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them…teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you….” (Mt. 28:19-20; cf. Jn. 14:15, 14:21, 15:10; Acts 1:2; 1 Th. 4:2; 1 Cor. 7:19; 1 Jn. 2:3, 3:22, 3:24, 5:2-3; 2 Jn. 6; Rev. 12:17).

Therefore, just as there was grace during the time of law, so there is law during the time of grace. There are grace and truth in the Old Testament, and law in the New Testament. Whatever it means to be under grace today, does not exclude laws.

So then, what exactly does it mean to be under law vs. under grace? It probably means to be under the authority of one of 2 covenants…

    • The covenant from ~1445 B.C. – 30 A.D. vs. the covenant from ~30 A.D. – the end
    • The covenant characterized by sin vs. the covenant characterized by obedience
    • The law covenant vs. the grace covenant
    • The Old Covenant vs. the New Covenant

Why then, is the Old Covenant called “law,” and the New Covenant called “grace?” Here is the likely reason…

Old Covenant “sanctification” blessings were based on law (works), while New Covenant blessings are based on promise (grace).

(Excerpted from the book: “ALL Old Testament Laws Cancelled”
24 Reasons Why All Old Testament Laws Are Cancelled, And All New Testament Laws Are for Our Obedience, by Greg Gibson, pp. 109-111.)

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“Everything the New Testament Says About the Whole Decalogue”

October 2, 2008

(The following is a free excerpt from the book “ALL Old Testament Laws Cancelled” by Greg Gibson)

Only 3 Passages, All Negative

As we saw above, the Holy Spirit never uses the names “Ten Commandments” or “moral law” in the New Testament. As a matter of fact, there are only 3 New Testament passages that definitely refer to the whole Decalogue, and they’re all negative…

1. “The letter,” “letters on stone,” and “tablets of stone” (2 Cor. 3:6-9) are:

• Not where the Spirit writes (2 Cor. 3:3)
• (What) kills (2 Cor. 3:6)
• A ministry of death (2 Cor. 3:7)
• A ministry of condemnation (2 Cor. 3:9)

2. “The handwriting of ordinances” (Col. 2:14) was:

• Blotted out (Col. 2:14)
• Taken away (Col. 2:14)
• Nailed to the cross (Col. 2:14)

3. “The tablets of the covenant” (Heb. 9:4) are:

• Obsolete (Heb. 8:13)
• Growing old (Heb. 8:13)
• Ready to vanish.” (Heb. 8:13)

(Excerpted from the book: “ALL Old Testament Laws Cancelled”
24 Reasons Why All Old Testament Laws Are Cancelled, And All New Testament Laws Are for Our Obedience, by Greg Gibson, p. 25.)

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“The 12 Names for the Decalogue”

October 2, 2008

(The following is a free excerpt from the book “ALL Old Testament Laws Cancelled” by Greg Gibson)

The 12 Names for the Decalogue in All 56 Verses:
“Ten Commandments” Only 3 Times (Zero in the N.T.)

When you hear the words, “Ten Commandments,” what’s the first thought that comes to your mind? If you automatically think, “The moral law of God,” then your view is very different from God’s view.

Depending on how you classify them, the whole Decalogue and its synonyms appear ~56 times in Scripture. (We’ll exclude the names “ark of the covenant,” “ark of the testimony,” and “tabernacle of the testimony,” even though they would be accurate.) And, in those 56 occurrences, God calls the Decalogue by 12 different names. Listed below, are the number of times He uses each name.

Old Testament:

14 = The tablets (Ex. 32:15, 32:16a,b, 32:19, 34:1b,c, 34:28; Deut. 9:17, 10:2a,b, 10:3, 10:4, 10:5; 2 Chr. 5:10)

13 = The tablets of stone (Ex. 24:12, 31:18, 34:1, 34:4a,b; Deut. 4:13, 5:22, 9:9, 9:10, 9:11, 10:1, 10:3; 1 Kg. 8:9)

10 = The testimony (Ex. 16:34, 25:16, 25:21, 27:21, 30:6, 30:36, 40:20; Lev. 16:13; Num 17:4, 17:10)

3 = The tablets of the testimony (Ex. 31:18, 32:15, 34:29)

3 = The tablets of the covenant (Deut. 9:9, 9:11, 9:15)

3 = The Ten Commandments (Ex. 34:28; Deut. 4:13; 10:4)

2 = The covenant (1 Kg. 8:21; 2 Chr. 6:11)

1 = The words of the covenant (Ex 34:28)

1 = His covenant (Deut. 4:13)

0 = The moral law

New Testament:

2 = The letter (2 Cor. 3:6a,b)

1 = Letters on stone (2 Cor. 3:7)

1 = Tablets of stone (2 Cor. 3:3)

1 = The handwriting of ordinances (Col. 2:14)

1 = The tablets of the covenant (Heb. 9:4)

0 = The Ten Commandments

0 = The moral law

So, when you hear the phrase “the Ten Commandments,” the first thought that should come to your mind is, “tablets (of stone”), not “moral law.” Remember, another thought that should come to your mind is “the covenant.”

Do you think of the Ten Commandments as “the tablets of stone,” and “the covenant” (Old Covenant made with Israel?) When talking about the Ten Commandments, if you have to rely on words uninspired by the Holy Spirit (like “moral law”) to explain your theology, then you probably have a different theology than the Holy Spirit.

Did you see how many times the phrase “Ten Commandments” appears in the New Testament? Zero! (Think about that.)

(Excerpted from the book: “ALL Old Testament Laws Cancelled”
24 Reasons Why All Old Testament Laws Are Cancelled And All New Testament Laws Are for Our Obedience, Greg Gibson, p. 23-24)

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